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Jamia convocation on Jan 19, PM Modi expresses inability to attend

“Degrees/Diplomas will be awarded to those candidates who have passed their examinations in the year 2014. Medals will also be given to the toppers of the same year. PhD scholars whose results have been notified up to November 30, 2015 will also be awarded degrees,” it added.

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It’s available on Flipkart, Amazon: Mumbai co denies making drone that Pak claims was India operated

Pakistan on Tuesday had raked up the drone issue again, claiming forensic tests showed that it was operated by India and manufactured by a Mumbai firm. However, the firm, ASCOM, has denied the allegations.

The Pakistan Army had claimed that an image retrieved proves that after the purchase of this quadcopter it was taken inside M/S ASCOM office which is an Indian communication and Electronic Firm.

The drone that Pakistan claims was operated by India. AFPThe drone that Pakistan claims was operated by India. AFP

The drone that Pakistan claims was operated by India. AFP

According to a Mumbai Mirror report, ASCOM has denied the allegations made by Inter-Services Public Relations (ISPR), the propaganda arm of ISI, saying the allegations were cooked up and the photographs of its office was taken from the company’s website.

India too had dismissed Pakistani allegations that the drone it downed along the Line of Control (LoC) was operated by the Indian Army as a “pure fabricated” and “disinformation campaign.”

“On a day, when terrorists from Pakistan carry out an attack in Gurdaspur, the Pakistani Army issues a statement on the alleged increase of violations by India on the LoC. It is funny,” Army sources had said.

Meanwhile Mumbai Mirror reports, “ASCOM said that since it is not empanelled with the Indian Army, providing it any hardware is out of question. It also said that the contraption Pakistan is calling a drone is, in fact, ‘hobby toy multirotor copter’ which can be bought off the shelf by anyone, including civilians, and is available on online stores like Flipkart, Amazon, and Snapdeal.”

The Pakistan military spokesman had alleged that the visuals retrieved out of the drone indicate that the Quadcopter flew from Indian post.

They claimed that initially it remained close to the LoC, continuing surveillance throughout facing towards Pakistani side of the LoC, then crossed over the LoC and pictured a Pakistani post.

The Pakistan Army has claimed that it downed an “India drone (Quadcopter) mission” on 15 July along the LoC.

The army also released images and video clips which show that the quadcopter started its flight from an Indian post and entered into Pakistani territory.

Another pre-flight picture indicates presence of an Indian soldier standing in the vicinity of quadcopter, it alleged.

An image probably taken before test flight of the drone on its arrival in forward areas indicate company headquarters of the Indian Sector, the army said.

An image taken by quadcopter immediately after flight from a post shows an Indian flag which proves that it started its flight from Indian post, it claimed.

But Chinese official media, the ruling Communist Party of China (CPC)-run People’s Daily Online, earlier reported that the phantom 3 drone was made in China by DJI, confirming Indian stance that it was of Chinese design.

Foreign Secretary S Jaishankar has also said that the drone was not in the inventory of the Indian defence forces.

The Pakistani army today also alleged that there was a “sudden spike both in terms of intensity, caliber escalation and air space violations by India” has been observed along LoC and the working boundary.

“Since 9 June 2015, 35 ceasefire violations have been committed by Indian troops,” it said.

With PTI inputs

Pakistan’s drone allegation ‘pure fabricated’ and ‘disinformation campaign’: Indian Army

Pakistan Army had alleged on Monday that forensic tests of the drone it downed along the LOC on July 15 showed it was operated by the Indian Army.
Representational Image

India today dismissed fresh Pakistani allegation that the drone it downed along the Line of Control (LoC) on July 15 was operated by the Indian Army as a “pure fabricated” and “disinformation campaign.””On a day, when terrorists from Pakistan carry out an attack in Gurdaspur, the Pakistani Army issues a statement on the alleged increase of violations by India on the LoC. It is funny,” Army sources said.Asked about Pakistan army’s release of pictures showing footage of a drone shot down on July 15, purportedly showing Indian territory, the sources said “it is fabricated and a part of the misinformation campaign.”<!– Dna_Article_Middle_300x250_BTF –>Pakistan Army had alleged on Monday that forensic tests of the drone it downed along the LOC on July 15 showed it was operated by the Indian Army.Pakistan Military spokesman had alleged that the visuals retrieved out of the drone indicate that the Quadcopter flew from a Indian post.Sources drove attention to Chinese media reports which have said that the drone, which was shot down on July 15, was never sold to India.

Pak’s drone allegation ‘pure fabricated’ and ‘disinformation campaign’, says Indian Army

New Delhi: India on Tuesday dismissed fresh Pakistani allegation that the drone it downed along the Line of Control (LoC) on 15 July was operated by the Indian Army as a “pure fabricated” and “disinformation campaign.”

The drone which Pakistan has claimed to have shot down along the Line of Control (LoC) in Pakistan occupied Kashmir. PTI

The drone which Pakistan has claimed to have shot down along the Line of Control (LoC) in Pakistan occupied Kashmir. PTI

“On a day, when terrorists from Pakistan carry out an attack in Gurdaspur, the Pakistani Army issues a statement on the alleged increase of violations by India on the LoC. It is funny,” Army sources said.

Asked about Pakistan army’s release of pictures showing footage of a drone shot down on 15 July, purportedly showing Indian territory, the sources said “it is fabricated and a part of the misinformation campaign.”

Pakistan Army had on Monday alleged that forensic tests of the drone it downed along the LOC on 15 July showed it was operated by the Indian Army.

Pakistan Military spokesman had alleged that the visuals retrieved out of the drone indicate that the Quadcopter flew from a Indian post.

Sources drove attention to Chinese media reports which have said that the drone, which was shot down on 15 July, was never sold to India.

PTI

Pakistan’s provocations show that the Modi-Doval dual strategy is working

India-Pakistan ties are back to normal – that is, the usual state of semi-peace and semi-war. That this is being interpreted in political and media circles as a defeat for Narendra Modi‘s recalibration of Pakistan policy to resume talks shows how little people understand strategy.

The correct Indian strategy against Pakistan will always have to be multi-faceted – realistic dialogue, backed by tough action and aggressive retaliation on the ground, when required. Both peace talk and war-like actions are critical to strategy. We do not seem to understand that war and peace go together, not separately. The readiness to wage peace, when the time is opportune, and the readiness to wage war, when required, is what makes for successful strategy. One without the other will lead to failure.

Indian policymakers, unfortunately, have never understood the importance of the iron fist in a velvet glove. We have let strategy be decided by public emotion or political peace fantasies, leading to regular failure. This is why we have lurched from extraordinary optimism when peace talks appear to be heading somewhere (Shimla, Lahore, and last May), and undiluted anger when Pakistani perfidy becomes visible (this usually follows the first).

To those who think that India’s strategy should only focus on Pakistan’s perfidy and nothing else, the simple point is this: this response, too, is driven by anger. It is not effective. Those who say we should not engage Pakistan at all, should ask themselves this: if this policy is right for Pakistan, why don’t they apply this logic to China, India’s bigger enemy and more potent threat to our long-term territorial and strategic interests? But all analysts steadfastly, without any fear of contradiction, maintain that we should both engage China and be prepared to defend our borders with it.

The logic of engagement and tough ground postures on the border with Pakistan is stronger for another reason: we cannot have a Pakistan strategy that is separate from our China strategy. What we are up against is a Sino-Pak joint strategic gameplan where Pakistan will take on India from the west while China will start pressuring us from the east (Myanmar, Arunachal).

PM Modi and National Security Advisor Ajit Doval. FirstpostPM Modi and National Security Advisor Ajit Doval. Firstpost

PM Modi and National Security Advisor Ajit Doval. Firstpost

There is huge strategic convergence between Pakistan’s and China’s postures towards India right now because both are “greedy” powers that want the territorial status quo with India altered without any concessions on their part. Pakistan wants to keep PoK and wrest a bit of Muslim Kashmir, and China wants to keep China-occupied Kashmir and grab a piece of Arunachal, especially Tawang. These are problems left behind by our mistakes in 1948, and China’s in 1962. In 1948, we failed to keep the war going in Kashmir long enough to recapture PoK (we possibly needed another month or two to finish the job), and China made the mistake of retreating from large parts of our north-east due to the onset of winter and its own doubts about its ability to hold on. It now wants to make up for that lapse, now that it has the military and economic capacity to do so. Tawang is key to final Chinese control of Tibet.

This convergence of Sino-Pak territorial interests makes it vital for us to work both prongs of dialogue and defence capability simultaneously. We need to carry this strategy forward till we are in a position to deter both our enemies with the development of economic and military strength.

The Chinese are trying to do exactly that with Pakistan. They are planning to build a $40 billion economic corridor to ensure that Pakistan is strengthened economically and strategically to counter India – and to slow down our economic and military renewal process. This is an economic-cum-military race we cannot afford to lose.

So, the Modi government is right to work on both axes – dialogue and determined military responses to cross-border provocations. That Pakistan is busy testing our determination so soon after Ufa should come as no surprise. It was to happen and has happened.

The difference between Pakistan and India is this: Pakistani strategy is decided by the army, which uses civilian governments to send out dovish messages even while deciding the stance on the border without civilian intervention. In India, civilian government is deciding strategy (no doubt, with military inputs) both on the diplomatic front and on the border. Till recently we had a half-baked non-strategy decided by hope or anger or despair with Pakistan.

Manmohan Singh had the right idea on engaging Pakistan, but the wrong one on not ever responding to border provocations. Under Modi and National Security Advisor Ajit Doval, the ground response is being made robust – and as long as talk and military action below the threshold of war continue consistently, Pakistan will get the message. The only danger is this government too will behave emotionally to Pakistani provocations by suspending talks – as we did last year. We cannot afford to again be so inconsistent. Then we are back to square one – that is, a situation of zero strategy, where our enemies have the initiative and we are only reactive.

The fact that Pakistan has felt it necessary to demolish the Ufa goodwill so quickly is proof that the dual-strategy of dialogue-plus-military response is working. We need to stay the course.

Pakistan provocations are proof that the Modi-Doval dual strategy is working

India-Pakistan ties are back to normal – that is, the usual state of semi-peace and semi-war. That this is being interpreted in political and media circles as a defeat for Narendra Modi‘s recalibration of Pakistan policy to resume talks shows how little people understand strategy.

The correct Indian strategy against Pakistan will always have to be multi-faceted – realistic dialogue, backed by tough action and aggressive retaliation on the ground, when required. Both peace talk and war-like actions are critical to strategy. We do not seem to understand that war and peace go together, not separately. The readiness to wage peace, when the time is opportune, and the readiness to wage war, when required, is what makes for successful strategy. One without the other will lead to failure.

Indian policymakers, unfortunately, have never understood the importance of the iron fist in a velvet glove. We have let strategy be decided by public emotion or political peace fantasies, leading to regular failure. This is why we have lurched from extraordinary optimism when peace talks appear to be heading somewhere (Shimla, Lahore, and last May), and undiluted anger when Pakistani perfidy becomes visible (this usually follows the first).

To those who think that India’s strategy should only focus on Pakistan’s perfidy and nothing else, the simple point is this: this response, too, is driven by anger. It is not effective. Those who say we should not engage Pakistan at all, should ask themselves this: if this policy is right for Pakistan, why don’t they apply this logic to China, India’s bigger enemy and more potent threat to our long-term territorial and strategic interests? But all analysts steadfastly, without any fear of contradiction, maintain that we should both engage China and be prepared to defend our borders with it.

The logic of engagement and tough ground postures on the border with Pakistan is stronger for another reason: we cannot have a Pakistan strategy that is separate from our China strategy. What we are up against is a Sino-Pak joint strategic gameplan where Pakistan will take on India from the west while China will start pressuring us from the east (Myanmar, Arunachal).

PM Modi and National Security Advisor Ajit Doval. FirstpostPM Modi and National Security Advisor Ajit Doval. Firstpost

PM Modi and National Security Advisor Ajit Doval. Firstpost

There is huge strategic convergence between Pakistan’s and China’s postures towards India right now because both are “greedy” powers that want the territorial status quo with India altered without any concessions on their part. Pakistan wants to keep PoK and wrest a bit of Muslim Kashmir, and China wants to keep China-occupied Kashmir and grab a piece of Arunachal, especially Tawang. These are problems left behind by our mistakes in 1948, and China’s in 1962. In 1948, we failed to keep the war going in Kashmir long enough to recapture PoK (we possibly needed another month or two to finish the job), and China made the mistake of retreating from large parts of our north-east due to the onset of winter and its own doubts about its ability to hold on. It now wants to make up for that lapse, now that it has the military and economic capacity to do so. Tawang is key to final Chinese control of Tibet.

This convergence of Sino-Pak territorial interests makes it vital for us to work both prongs of dialogue and defence capability simultaneously. We need to carry this strategy forward till we are in a position to deter both our enemies with the development of economic and military strength.

The Chinese are trying to do exactly that with Pakistan. They are planning to build a $40 billion economic corridor to ensure that Pakistan is strengthened economically and strategically to counter India – and to slow down our economic and military renewal process. This is an economic-cum-military race we cannot afford to lose.

So, the Modi government is right to work on both axes – dialogue and determined military responses to cross-border provocations. That Pakistan is busy testing our determination so soon after Ufa should come as no surprise. It was to happen and has happened.

The difference between Pakistan and India is this: Pakistani strategy is decided by the army, which uses civilian governments to send out dovish messages even while deciding the stance on the border without civilian intervention. In India, civilian government is deciding strategy (no doubt, with military inputs) both on the diplomatic front and on the border. Till recently we had a half-baked non-strategy decided by hope or anger or despair with Pakistan.

Manmohan Singh had the right idea on engaging Pakistan, but the wrong one on not ever responding to border provocations. Under Modi and National Security Advisor Ajit Doval, the ground response is being made robust – and as long as talk and military action below the threshold of war continue consistently, Pakistan will get the message. The only danger is this government too will behave emotionally to Pakistani provocations by suspending talks – as we did last year. We cannot afford to again be so inconsistent. Then we are back to square one – that is, a situation of zero strategy, where our enemies have the initiative and we are only reactive.

The fact that Pakistan has felt it necessary to demolish the Ufa goodwill so quickly is proof that the dual-strategy of dialogue-plus-military response is working. We need to stay the course.

Person detained for using drone to photograph Bhabha Atomic Research Centre

Mumbai: Mumbai Police on Tuesday detained a person for illegally using a drone to photograph the Trombay-based Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC), a police official said.

The detainee has been identified as Shivkumar Sahane, an employee of a well known property website, DCP (Zone VI) Sangramsingh Nishandar said, adding, two more detentions are likely in the case.

Representational image. AFP

Representational image. AFP

Three people were seen using a remote-controlled drone on Monday flying at a height of about 55 feet, the police official said.

“The drone flew for nearly 25 minutes over the BARC campus,” the police official said.

The incident occurred at about 12.30 PM, which was witnessed by a professor who videographed the entire incident on his mobile phone and submitted it to the police, the official said.

He said the professor who was passing by is an eyewitness in the case.

After photographing the BARC campus, the trio sat in a silver coloured Toyota car and fled the spot, the police official said.

A case has been lodged at the Trombay police station and the police located Sahane with the help of the professor’s video recording, after which he has been detained for questioning, the police official said.

The detainee told the police that the BARC campus was photographed to upload it onto the property website, according to the police official said.

The police has not made any arrests so far but the trio could be booked for illegally using drones without having permission from concerned authorities or the police, he said.

PTI

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