Yuva Sai Sagar

Online news channel!

Tag: europe

Fire engulfs Dubai hotel near world’s tallest building | Reuters

(function (d) {
var js, s = d.getElementsByTagName(‘script’)[0];
js = d.createElement(‘script’);
js.async = true;
js.src = ‘//cdn.teads.tv/media/format.js’;
s.parentNode.insertBefore(js, s);
})(window.document);
<!– FP CRONTAB –>

Arrests, security fears dampen New Year spirit in Europe | Reuters

(function (d) {
var js, s = d.getElementsByTagName(‘script’)[0];
js = d.createElement(‘script’);
js.async = true;
js.src = ‘//cdn.teads.tv/media/format.js’;
s.parentNode.insertBefore(js, s);
})(window.document);
<!– FP CRONTAB –>

Islamic State suffers double blow as Ramadi falls, leaders killed | Reuters

(function (d) {
var js, s = d.getElementsByTagName(‘script’)[0];
js = d.createElement(‘script’);
js.async = true;
js.src = ‘//cdn.teads.tv/media/format.js’;
s.parentNode.insertBefore(js, s);
})(window.document);
<!– FP CRONTAB –>

No Detention Policy: Maharashtra says policy should be practised only till Class IV

Many states like Delhi and Rajasthan have opposed the No Dentition Policy, a decision taken to reduce pressure and students and avoid dropouts from school.

PTI
Info

<!– –>

0
0
0

TOP
<!– /.block –>TOP <!– /.block –>
<</h2>
Over one million reach Europe by sea in 2015: UN <!– /.block –>
<!– /.block –>
<!– /.block –>
Also ReadIndiaEntry denied: US cites immigration assessment, India tell it to honour visasIndiaBJP rubbishes Mamata Banerjee govt’s claims on West Bengal’s growthIndiaPM Modi’s nod must for suspending IAS officers working with CentreIndiaAt Sivagiri mutt, Sonia Gandhi makes veiled attack on BJPIndia2015 Report Card: From Modi to Kejriwal, here’s how our top politicians faredIndiaOdd-even rule: CM Arvind Kejriwal warns volunteers against ‘misbehaving’ <!– /.block –>

<!– /#sidebar-second –>Over one million reach Europe by sea in 2015: UN<!– /.block –> <!– /#content_bottom –>
<!– /11440465/DNA_Article_Desktop_970x90_BTF –><!– /.block –><!– /11440465/DNA_Article_Tablet_728x90_BTF –><!– /.block –> <!– /#bottom_bar –>

<!– footer start –>

Partner site: Zee News
©2015 Diligent Media Corporation Ltd.

<!– footer end –>
<!– ExpCom CGP –>

India asks authorities to take action to save choking capital | Reuters

(function (d) {
var js, s = d.getElementsByTagName(‘script’)[0];
js = d.createElement(‘script’);
js.async = true;
js.src = ‘//cdn.teads.tv/media/format.js’;
s.parentNode.insertBefore(js, s);
})(window.document);
<!– FP CRONTAB –>

Improved United draw with Chelsea, Arsenal go top | Reuters

(function (d) {
var js, s = d.getElementsByTagName(‘script’)[0];
js = d.createElement(‘script’);
js.async = true;
js.src = ‘//cdn.teads.tv/media/format.js’;
s.parentNode.insertBefore(js, s);
})(window.document);
<!– FP CRONTAB –>

Spurs win at Watford, Arnautovic sinks Everton | Reuters

(function (d) {
var js, s = d.getElementsByTagName(‘script’)[0];
js = d.createElement(‘script’);
js.async = true;
js.src = ‘//cdn.teads.tv/media/format.js’;
s.parentNode.insertBefore(js, s);
})(window.document);
<!– FP CRONTAB –>

Broad double strike rocks South Africa | Reuters

(function (d) {
var js, s = d.getElementsByTagName(‘script’)[0];
js = d.createElement(‘script’);
js.async = true;
js.src = ‘//cdn.teads.tv/media/format.js’;
s.parentNode.insertBefore(js, s);
})(window.document);
<!– FP CRONTAB –>

Boxing Day blues for Leicester, United, Arsenal | Reuters

(function (d) {
var js, s = d.getElementsByTagName(‘script’)[0];
js = d.createElement(‘script’);
js.async = true;
js.src = ‘//cdn.teads.tv/media/format.js’;
s.parentNode.insertBefore(js, s);
})(window.document);
<!– FP CRONTAB –>

Behind the scenes, Pakistan’s military helped revive talks with India | Reuters

(function (d) {
var js, s = d.getElementsByTagName(‘script’)[0];
js = d.createElement(‘script’);
js.async = true;
js.src = ‘//cdn.teads.tv/media/format.js’;
s.parentNode.insertBefore(js, s);
})(window.document);
<!– FP CRONTAB –>

Austrian police say European capitals have been warned of possible attack | Reuters

(function (d) {
var js, s = d.getElementsByTagName(‘script’)[0];
js = d.createElement(‘script’);
js.async = true;
js.src = ‘//cdn.teads.tv/media/format.js’;
s.parentNode.insertBefore(js, s);
})(window.document);
<!– FP CRONTAB –>

China landslide disaster caused by safety breaches – cabinet website | Reuters

(function (d) {
var js, s = d.getElementsByTagName(‘script’)[0];
js = d.createElement(‘script’);
js.async = true;
js.src = ‘//cdn.teads.tv/media/format.js’;
s.parentNode.insertBefore(js, s);
})(window.document);
<!– FP CRONTAB –>

Modi arranged surprise Pakistan visit just hours before – official | Reuters

(function (d) {
var js, s = d.getElementsByTagName(‘script’)[0];
js = d.createElement(‘script’);
js.async = true;
js.src = ‘//cdn.teads.tv/media/format.js’;
s.parentNode.insertBefore(js, s);
})(window.document);
<!– FP CRONTAB –>

Modi to meet Pakistani PM Nawaz Sharif in Lahore | Reuters

(function (d) {
var js, s = d.getElementsByTagName(‘script’)[0];
js = d.createElement(‘script’);
js.async = true;
js.src = ‘//cdn.teads.tv/media/format.js’;
s.parentNode.insertBefore(js, s);
})(window.document);
<!– FP CRONTAB –>

Myanmar men sentenced to death for murder of British tourists in Thailand | Reuters

(function (d) {
var js, s = d.getElementsByTagName(‘script’)[0];
js = d.createElement(‘script’);
js.async = true;
js.src = ‘//cdn.teads.tv/media/format.js’;
s.parentNode.insertBefore(js, s);
})(window.document);
<!– FP CRONTAB –>

US President Barack Obama most popular leader in world, PM Modi stands 7th: Survey

“);
}
$(‘.social-sticky’).addClass(‘sticky-social-top’);
}else{
$(‘.social-sticky’).removeClass(‘sticky-social-top’);
$(‘.social-sticky’).html(shtml);
}
});
}

Modi evoked a favourable view from 24 % of people polled throughout 65 countries around the world as opposed to 20 % unfavourable, giving him a score of +4 % in the WIN/Gallup survey for ORB International’s ‘International World Leader Index’.
File Photo
Getty Images
Prime Minister Narendra Modi has been voted as the seventh most popular leader in the world in a new poll topped by US President Barack Obama. Modi evoked a favourable view from 24 % of people polled throughout 65 countries around the world as opposed to 20 % unfavourable, giving him a score of +4 % in the WIN/Gallup survey for ORB International’s ‘International World Leader Index’.Modi was however beaten by Chinese President Xi Jinping, who was named the sixth most popular leader but had a higher unfavourable score than the Indian leader — 30 %. Obama grabbed the topmost spot with a score of +30 % with a whopping 59 % in his favour and 29 % unfavourable.<!– Dna_Article_Middle_300x250_BTF –>”President Obama is significantly more admired around the world than anyone else,” the survey said.Obama is followed by German Chancellor Angela Merkel (+13 %) with British Prime Minister David Cameron completing the top three with a score of +10 %. Cameron scored a 37 % favourable rating while another 28 % viewed him unfavourably.People in South Asia were the most friendly to the British leader, with 53 % saying they viewed him favourably and just 12 % saying they viewed him unfavourably. He was also popular in the rest of Europe and sub-Saharan Africa, where 44 % of people viewed Cameron favourably.The other leaders that made it to the top 10 include French President Francois Hollande (4th), Russian Prime Minister Vladimir Putin (5th), Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff (8th), Saudi Arabia King Salman bin Abdulaziz al Saud (9th) and Iranian President Hassan Rouhani (10th).

Nepal’s Madhesis decide to press on with protests on India border | Reuters

(function (d) {
var js, s = d.getElementsByTagName(‘script’)[0];
js = d.createElement(‘script’);
js.async = true;
js.src = ‘//cdn.teads.tv/media/format.js’;
s.parentNode.insertBefore(js, s);
})(window.document);
<!– FP CRONTAB –>

Remo Fernandes no longer Indian citizen; summons issued through Portugese embassy

“);
}
$(‘.social-sticky’).addClass(‘sticky-social-top’);
}else{
$(‘.social-sticky’).removeClass(‘sticky-social-top’);
$(‘.social-sticky’).html(shtml);
}
});
}

The 62-year old singer is accused of threatening a minor girl at Goa Medical College And Hospital where she was being treated after being hit by a car driven by Remo’s son Jonah.
File Photo

Pop singer Remo Fernandes, accused of threatening a girl, had surrendered his Indian citizenship and become a Portuguese national, the Goa police on Tuesday said. He had been issued a summons through the Portuguese embassy to appear before the investigating officer, the police said.The 62-year old singer is accused of threatening a minor girl at Goa Medical College And Hospital where she was being treated after being hit by a car driven by Remo’s son Jonah.”Remo has already surrendered his Indian passport and taken Portuguese citizenship. So we had to issue him a summons through the Portuguese embassy,” inspector Jivba Dalvi said.<!– Dna_Article_Middle_300x250_BTF –>He has been asked to appear before the investigating officer at 4 pm tomorrow, while his son has been summoned at 10 am.Police had earlier asked Remo to be present on Monday, but he didn’t turn up, so a second summons was issued.”We have already submitted the summons to the Foreigner Regional Registration Office which will forward it to the embassy,” inspector Dalvi said.Remo, who resides in Goa but is currently touring Europe, has said the charges against him are baseless.

Blatter and Platini banned by FIFA for eight years | Reuters

(function (d) {
var js, s = d.getElementsByTagName(‘script’)[0];
js = d.createElement(‘script’);
js.async = true;
js.src = ‘//cdn.teads.tv/media/format.js’;
s.parentNode.insertBefore(js, s);
})(window.document);
<!– FP CRONTAB –>

Bangladesh court accepts Rana Plaza murder charge sheet | Reuters

(function (d) {
var js, s = d.getElementsByTagName(‘script’)[0];
js = d.createElement(‘script’);
js.async = true;
js.src = ‘//cdn.teads.tv/media/format.js’;
s.parentNode.insertBefore(js, s);
})(window.document);
<!– FP CRONTAB –>

Barca sweep to another title in one-sided contest | Reuters

(function (d) {
var js, s = d.getElementsByTagName(‘script’)[0];
js = d.createElement(‘script’);
js.async = true;
js.src = ‘//cdn.teads.tv/media/format.js’;
s.parentNode.insertBefore(js, s);
})(window.document);
<!– FP CRONTAB –>

‘Star Wars’ sales surge towards opening weekend record | Reuters

(function (d) {
var js, s = d.getElementsByTagName(‘script’)[0];
js = d.createElement(‘script’);
js.async = true;
js.src = ‘//cdn.teads.tv/media/format.js’;
s.parentNode.insertBefore(js, s);
})(window.document);
<!– FP CRONTAB –>

Mother Teresa of Calcutta to be made a saint | Reuters

(function (d) {
var js, s = d.getElementsByTagName(‘script’)[0];
js = d.createElement(‘script’);
js.async = true;
js.src = ‘//cdn.teads.tv/media/format.js’;
s.parentNode.insertBefore(js, s);
})(window.document);
<!– FP CRONTAB –>

India upgrades its air defences from Russia for Rs 30000 crore

(function (d) {
var js, s = d.getElementsByTagName(‘script’)[0];
js = d.createElement(‘script’);
js.async = true;
js.src = ‘//cdn.teads.tv/media/format.js’;
s.parentNode.insertBefore(js, s);
})(window.document);
<!– FP CRONTAB –>

Mourinho sacked as Chelsea manager | Reuters

(function (d) {
var js, s = d.getElementsByTagName(‘script’)[0];
js = d.createElement(‘script’);
js.async = true;
js.src = ‘//cdn.teads.tv/media/format.js’;
s.parentNode.insertBefore(js, s);
})(window.document);
<!– FP CRONTAB –>

Chelsea sack ‘Special One’ Mourinho after dreadful start | Reuters

(function (d) {
var js, s = d.getElementsByTagName(‘script’)[0];
js = d.createElement(‘script’);
js.async = true;
js.src = ‘//cdn.teads.tv/media/format.js’;
s.parentNode.insertBefore(js, s);
})(window.document);
<!– FP CRONTAB –>

RBI announces new rules for how banks can set lending rates | Reuters

(function (d) {
var js, s = d.getElementsByTagName(‘script’)[0];
js = d.createElement(‘script’);
js.async = true;
js.src = ‘//cdn.teads.tv/media/format.js’;
s.parentNode.insertBefore(js, s);
})(window.document);
<!– FP CRONTAB –>

Mahindra’s discount deal shows Pininfarina’s limited options | Reuters

(function (d) {
var js, s = d.getElementsByTagName(‘script’)[0];
js = d.createElement(‘script’);
js.async = true;
js.src = ‘//cdn.teads.tv/media/format.js’;
s.parentNode.insertBefore(js, s);
})(window.document);
<!– FP CRONTAB –>

Arsenal back on top as Villa capitulate again | Reuters

(function (d) {
var js, s = d.getElementsByTagName(‘script’)[0];
js = d.createElement(‘script’);
js.async = true;
js.src = ‘//cdn.teads.tv/media/format.js’;
s.parentNode.insertBefore(js, s);
})(window.document);
<!– FP CRONTAB –>

For U.N.’s Ban, climate deal is personal victory after setbacks | Reuters

(function (d) {
var js, s = d.getElementsByTagName(‘script’)[0];
js = d.createElement(‘script’);
js.async = true;
js.src = ‘//cdn.teads.tv/media/format.js’;
s.parentNode.insertBefore(js, s);
})(window.document);
<!– FP CRONTAB –>

At least 848 Afghan civilian casualties in Kunduz – U.N. | Reuters

(function (d) {
var js, s = d.getElementsByTagName(‘script’)[0];
js = d.createElement(‘script’);
js.async = true;
js.src = ‘//cdn.teads.tv/media/format.js’;
s.parentNode.insertBefore(js, s);
})(window.document);
<!– FP CRONTAB –>

World climate accord hailed as turning point from fossil fuels | Reuters

(function (d) {
var js, s = d.getElementsByTagName(‘script’)[0];
js = d.createElement(‘script’);
js.async = true;
js.src = ‘//cdn.teads.tv/media/format.js’;
s.parentNode.insertBefore(js, s);
})(window.document);
<!– FP CRONTAB –>

Taliban attack on Spanish embassy in Kabul dims hopes of peace talks | Reuters

(function (d) {
var js, s = d.getElementsByTagName(‘script’)[0];
js = d.createElement(‘script’);
js.async = true;
js.src = ‘//cdn.teads.tv/media/format.js’;
s.parentNode.insertBefore(js, s);
})(window.document);
<!– FP CRONTAB –>

Islamic extremists ignored contact attempts by wife in California shooting – sources | Reuters

(function (d) {
var js, s = d.getElementsByTagName(‘script’)[0];
js = d.createElement(‘script’);
js.async = true;
js.src = ‘//cdn.teads.tv/media/format.js’;
s.parentNode.insertBefore(js, s);
})(window.document);
<!– FP CRONTAB –>

Facebook’s Zuckerberg speaks out in support of Muslims | Reuters

(function (d) {
var js, s = d.getElementsByTagName(‘script’)[0];
js = d.createElement(‘script’);
js.async = true;
js.src = ‘//cdn.teads.tv/media/format.js’;
s.parentNode.insertBefore(js, s);
})(window.document);
<!– FP CRONTAB –>

Sold: The Mumbai eatery owned by India’s most wanted man Dawood Ibrahim | Reuters

(function (d) {
var js, s = d.getElementsByTagName(‘script’)[0];
js = d.createElement(‘script’);
js.async = true;
js.src = ‘//cdn.teads.tv/media/format.js’;
s.parentNode.insertBefore(js, s);
})(window.document);
<!– FP CRONTAB –>

Sushma Swaraj says high-level talks with Pakistan to resume | Reuters

(function (d) {
var js, s = d.getElementsByTagName(‘script’)[0];
js = d.createElement(‘script’);
js.async = true;
js.src = ‘//cdn.teads.tv/media/format.js’;
s.parentNode.insertBefore(js, s);
})(window.document);
<!– FP CRONTAB –>

India ready to impose more curbs on steel imports | Reuters

(function (d) {
var js, s = d.getElementsByTagName(‘script’)[0];
js = d.createElement(‘script’);
js.async = true;
js.src = ‘//cdn.teads.tv/media/format.js’;
s.parentNode.insertBefore(js, s);
})(window.document);
<!– FP CRONTAB –>

Verizon could explore Yahoo’s Internet business, CFO says | Reuters

(function (d) {
var js, s = d.getElementsByTagName(‘script’)[0];
js = d.createElement(‘script’);
js.async = true;
js.src = ‘//cdn.teads.tv/media/format.js’;
s.parentNode.insertBefore(js, s);
})(window.document);
<!– FP CRONTAB –>

Washington denies U.S.-led coalition hit Syria army camp | Reuters

(function (d) {
var js, s = d.getElementsByTagName(‘script’)[0];
js = d.createElement(‘script’);
js.async = true;
js.src = ‘//cdn.teads.tv/media/format.js’;
s.parentNode.insertBefore(js, s);
})(window.document);
<!– FP CRONTAB –>

U.S. box office: ‘Hunger Games,’ ‘Krampus’ top slow post-Thanksgiving weekend | Reuters

(function (d) {
var js, s = d.getElementsByTagName(‘script’)[0];
js = d.createElement(‘script’);
js.async = true;
js.src = ‘//cdn.teads.tv/media/format.js’;
s.parentNode.insertBefore(js, s);
})(window.document);
<!– FP CRONTAB –>

Modi mocked and Jayalalithaa heckled after floods | Reuters

(function (d) {
var js, s = d.getElementsByTagName(‘script’)[0];
js = d.createElement(‘script’);
js.async = true;
js.src = ‘//cdn.teads.tv/media/format.js’;
s.parentNode.insertBefore(js, s);
})(window.document);
<!– FP CRONTAB –>

Kardashian, Kanye West announce birth of son on Saturday | Reuters

(function (d) {
var js, s = d.getElementsByTagName(‘script’)[0];
js = d.createElement(‘script’);
js.async = true;
js.src = ‘//cdn.teads.tv/media/format.js’;
s.parentNode.insertBefore(js, s);
})(window.document);
<!– FP CRONTAB –>

Myanmar’s Suu Kyi ‘optimistic’ after historic talks with ex-enemy | Reuters

(function (d) {
var js, s = d.getElementsByTagName(‘script’)[0];
js = d.createElement(‘script’);
js.async = true;
js.src = ‘//cdn.teads.tv/media/format.js’;
s.parentNode.insertBefore(js, s);
})(window.document);
<!– FP CRONTAB –>

India in command after Kohli leads by example | Reuters

(function (d) {
var js, s = d.getElementsByTagName(‘script’)[0];
js = d.createElement(‘script’);
js.async = true;
js.src = ‘//cdn.teads.tv/media/format.js’;
s.parentNode.insertBefore(js, s);
})(window.document);
<!– FP CRONTAB –>

Modi spoofed over doctored photos of Chennai flood visit | Reuters

(function (d) {
var js, s = d.getElementsByTagName(‘script’)[0];
js = d.createElement(‘script’);
js.async = true;
js.src = ‘//cdn.teads.tv/media/format.js’;
s.parentNode.insertBefore(js, s);
})(window.document);
<!– FP CRONTAB –>

Two Americas soccer bosses arrested as FIFA corruption scandal deepens | Reuters

(function (d) {
var js, s = d.getElementsByTagName(‘script’)[0];
js = d.createElement(‘script’);
js.async = true;
js.src = ‘//cdn.teads.tv/media/format.js’;
s.parentNode.insertBefore(js, s);
})(window.document);
<!– FP CRONTAB –>

British parliament votes for air strikes against militants in Syria | Reuters

LONDON British lawmakers voted by 397 to 223 on Wednesday in favour of launching air strikes against Islamic State militants in Syria after more than 10 hours of debate.

Britain has been bombing in Iraq for more than a year and Prime Minister David Cameron had urged lawmakers to back extending air strikes to Syria to target militants he said were plotting attacks on the West.

(Reporting by Kylie MacLellan, editing by Elizabeth Piper)

This story has not been edited by Firstpost staff and is generated by auto-feed.

Russia says it has proof Turkey involved in Islamic State oil trade | Reuters

MOSCOW Russia’s defence ministry said on Wednesday it had proof that Turkish President Tayyip Erdogan and his family were benefiting from the illegal smuggling of oil from Islamic State-held territory in Syria and Iraq.

Moscow and Ankara have been locked in a war of words since last week when a Turkish air force jet shot down a Russian warplane near the Syrian-Turkish border, the most serious incident between Russia and a NATO state in half a century.

Erdogan ressponded by saying no one had the right to “slander” Turkey by accusing it of buying oil from Islamic State, and that he would stand down if such allegations were proven to be true. But speaking during a visit to Qatar, he also said he did not want relations with Moscow to worsen further.

At a briefing in Moscow, defence ministry officials displayed satellite images which they said showed columns of tanker trucks loading with oil at installations controlled by Islamic State in Syria and Iraq, and then crossing the border into neighbouring Turkey.

The officials did not specify what direct evidence they had of the involvement of Erdogan and his family, an allegation that the Turkish president has vehemently denied.

“Turkey is the main consumer of the oil stolen from its rightful owners, Syria and Iraq. According to information we’ve received, the senior political leadership of the country – President Erdogan and his family – are involved in this criminal business,” said Deputy Defence Minister Anatoly Antonov.

“Maybe I’m being too blunt, but one can only entrust control over this thieving business to one’s closest associates.”

“In the West, no one has asked questions about the fact that the Turkish president’s son heads one of the biggest energy companies, or that his son-in-law has been appointed energy minister. What a marvellous family business!”

“The cynicism of the Turkish leadership knows no limits. Look what they’re doing. They went into someone else’s country, they are robbing it without compunction,” Antonov said.

Erdogan last week denied that Turkey procures oil from anything other than legitimate sources.

He has said Ankara is taking active steps to prevent fuel smuggling, and he challenged anyone who accused his government of collaborating with Islamic State to prove their allegations.

On Tuesday, U.S. President Barack Obama said Turkey had made progress in sealing its border with Syria, but Islamic State was still exploiting gaps to bring in foreign fighters and sell oil.

WEAPONS FLOW

The Russian defence ministry also alleged that the same criminal networks which were smuggling oil into Turkey were also supplying weapons, equipment and training to Islamic State and other Islamist groups.

“According to our reliable intelligence data, Turkey has been carrying out such operations for a long period and on a regular basis. And most importantly, it does not plan to stop them,” Sergei Rudskoy, deputy head of the Russian military’s General Staff, told reporters.

The defence ministry said its surveillance revealed that hundreds of tanker trucks were gathering in plain sight at Islamic State-controlled sites in Iraq and Syria to load up with oil, and it questioned why the U.S.-led coalition was not launching more air strikes on them.

“It’s hard not to notice them,” Rudskoy said of the lines of trucks shown on satellite images.

Officials said that the Russian air force’s bombing campaign had made a significant dent in Islamic State’s ability to produce, refine and sell oil.

SMUGGLING ROUTES

Ministry officials described three main routes by which they said oil and oil products were smuggled from Islamic State territory into Turkey.

It said the Western route took oil produced at fields near the Syrian city of Raqqa to the settlement of Azaz on the border with Turkey.

From there the columns of tanker trucks pass through the Turkish town of Reyhanli, the ministry said, citing what it said were satellite pictures of hundreds of such trucks moving through the border crossing without obstruction.

“There is no inspection of the vehicles carried out … on the Turkish side,” said Rudskoy.

Some of the smuggled cargoes go to the Turkish domestic market, while some is exported via the Turkish Mediterranean ports of Iskenderun and Dortyol, the ministry said.

Another main route for smuggled oil, according to the ministry, runs from Deir Ez-zour in Syria to the Syrian border crossing at Al-Qamishli. It said the trucks then took the crude for refining at the Turkish city of Batman.

A third route took oil from eastern Syria and western Iraq into the south-eastern corner of Turkey, the ministry said.

It said its satellite surveillance had captured hundreds of trucks crossing the border in that area back in the summer, and that since then there had been no reduction in the flow.

The defence ministry officials said the information they released on Wednesday was only part of the evidence they have in their possession, and that they would be releasing further intelligence in the next days and weeks.

(Additional reporting by Alexander Winning; Writing by Christian Lowe; Editing by Andrew Osborn and Giles Elgood)

This story has not been edited by Firstpost staff and is generated by auto-feed.

India’s Modi says developing nations need space to grow | Reuters

PARIS Developing countries need room to develop while fighting climate change, India’s Prime Minister Narendra Modi told delegates at the start of two weeks of U.N. talks in Paris on Monday.

“The prosperous still have a strong carbon footprint and the world’s billions at the bottom of the development ladder are seeking space to grow. So the choices are not easy,” Modi said.

Earlier, he held talks with U.S. President Barack Obama during which Modi pledged to ensure India’s development would go “hand in hand” with environmental protection, while Obama acknowledged India’s right to grow and fight poverty.

(Reporting by Barbara Lewis, editing by Alister Doyle)

This story has not been edited by Firstpost staff and is generated by auto-feed.

Briton Fury crowned world champion after beating Klitschko | Reuters

DUESSELDORF, Germany Underdog Tyson Fury caused a huge boxing upset on Saturday, stunning Wladimir Klitschko with a points victory to snatch the champion’s four titles and become the first Briton to hold a world heavyweight crown since 2011.

Undefeated Fury, who improved his record to 25-0 and now has the WBA, WBO, IBF and IBO belts, was never troubled by the 39-year-old Ukrainian who suffered his first loss in 11 years and has already demanded a rematch.

“He’s been a great champion, but every good dog has its day,” challenger Fury told a 50,000 crowd at Duesseldorf’s Esprit Arena.

“Tonight is that start of a new era. I will be the most charismatic champion since Muhammad Ali,” he said before serenading his wife in the crowd with a song by American band Aerosmith.

“I worked for six months for this in the gym, it’s a dream come true,” Fury said while draped in his new world title belts and unable to hold back the tears.

The fight, postponed once due to a Klitschko injury, almost did not take place with Fury’s team complaining earlier on Saturday over the thick ring canvas that they claimed limited his movement.

Modifications were made and Fury, quick, despite his 2.06 metres, was better from the start, showing no problems with the new canvas.

He kept landing left-right combinations with Klitschko, not used to fighting taller men than him, struggling with Fury’s reach.

Klitschko managed to get close with a few good left jabs in the second round but Fury landed a powerful right, pushing the Ukrainian back.

Fury, constantly changing between southpaw and orthodox stance, kept chipping away at Klitschko’s defences with his combinations and by the eighth round the champion was bleeding from a cheek wound.

Fury, who shed 32 kilos in five months to get in shape for the fight, landed a bruising left uppercut in the ninth that wounded Klitschko’s right eye.

Sensing the titles slipping away, Klitschko threw everything he had in the final round in search for a knockout but ended up losing on all three of the judges’ scorecards, putting an end to his winning run that stretched back to 2004.

“Tyson really stepped on the gas,” said a disappointed Klitschko, fighting in front of a home crowd with his base in Germany.

“I was missing my speed today and I struggled with his reach.

“I knew I was behind and had to land the punches. I tried but it did not work.”

(Editing by Greg Stutchbury)

This story has not been edited by Firstpost staff and is generated by auto-feed.

Kremlin says Putin ‘fully mobilised’ to tackle threat from Turkey | Reuters

MOSCOW President Vladimir Putin is fully mobilised to tackle what the Kremlin regards as an unprecedented threat from Turkey following the shooting down of one of its warplanes by a Turkish F-16, the Russian leader’s spokesman said on Saturday.

In comments which underscore how angry the Kremlin still is over the incident, Dmitry Peskov, Putin’s spokesman, called the behaviour of the Turkish air force “absolute madness” and said Ankara’s subsequent handling of the crisis had reminded him of the “theatre of the absurd.”

“Nobody has the right to traitorously shoot down a Russian plane from behind,” Peskov told Russia’s “News on Saturday” TV programme, calling Turkish evidence purporting to show the Russian SU-24 jet had violated Turkish air space “cartoons”.

In another sign of tensions after its shooting down of the Russian plane on Tuesday, which resulted in the death of one of the pilots, Turkey’s foreign ministry advised people on Saturday to postpone all non-urgent travel to Russia.

Peskov said the crisis had prompted Putin, whose ministers are preparing retaliatory economic measures against Turkey, to “mobilise” in the way an army does in tense times.

“The president is mobilised, fully mobilised, mobilised to the extent that circumstances demand,” said Peskov.

“The circumstances are unprecedented. The gauntlet thrown down to Russia is unprecedented. So naturally the reaction is in line with this threat.”

President Tayyip Erdogan has said Turkey will not apologise for downing the jet, but he said on Saturday that the incident had saddened him and that the climate change summit in Paris next week could be a chance to repair relations with Moscow.

“Confrontation will not bring anyone happiness. As much as Russia is important for Turkey, Turkey is important for Russia,” Erdogan said in a televised speech in the western city of Baliksehir.

Peskov said Putin was aware of a Turkish request for him to meet Erdogan on the sidelines of the Paris conference but gave no indication of whether such a meeting would take place.

Peskov denied Turkish press reports which said Moscow and Ankara had struck a deal for their warplanes to stop flying along the Syrian-Turkish border, saying military ties between the two countries had been severed and a hot line meant to avoid misunderstandings among their pilots dismantled.

Peskov, according to the TASS news agency, also spoke of how Erdogan’s son had a “certain interest” in the oil industry. Putin has said oil from Syrian territory controlled by Islamic State militants is finding its way to Turkey.

Erdogan has spoken of slander and asked anyone making such accusations to back up their words with evidence.

Peskov said he “noted” that Turkey’s newly-appointed energy minister, Berat Albayrak, was Erdogan’s son-in-law.

He added that there could be up to 200,000 Turkish citizens on Russian soil. “What’s important is that everyone who is able to use their influence to guarantee at least some predictability in the pattern of Turkey’s behaviour,” Peskov said.

“Russian planes should never be shot down.”

(Additional reporting by Yesim Dikmen in Istanbul, Tulay Karadeniz and Dasha Afanasieva in Ankara; Editing by Dominic Evans)

This story has not been edited by Firstpost staff and is generated by auto-feed.

Obama says U.S. has to do something about guns after Colorado shooting | Reuters

WASHINGTON Expressing what has become regularly repeated frustration on the issue, President Barack Obama said on Saturday the United States needs to “do something” to make it harder for criminals to get guns after a shooting in Colorado killed three people and injured nine.

“We have to do something about the easy accessibility of weapons of war on our streets to people who have no business wielding them. Period,” Obama said in a statement. “Enough is enough.”

In Friday’s shooting, an assailant opened fire at a Planned Parenthood clinic, a center that provides health services including abortions, in Colorado Springs.

It was the latest in a long series of U.S. mass shootings during Obama’s seven years in office. He has called the December 2012 shooting at Sandy Hook elementary school in Newtown, Connecticut, his toughest day as president.

Obama said it was too soon to know the Colorado Springs shooter’s “so-called motive” but said the tragedy was more evidence pointing to the need to reform firearms laws.

“This is not normal,” said Obama, who has become increasingly forthright in urging gun control measures when he makes statements after such events. “We can’t let it become normal.”

Obama tried to tighten up gun laws after the Newtown shootings, but met resistance in the U.S. Congress, including from some of his fellow Democrats, and failed to push a measure through.

After another deadly shooting at an Oregon community college last month, Obama said White House lawyers would pore through existing laws to look for new ways he could use his executive powers to enforce regulations.

One of those options would require more gun dealers to get a license to sell guns, which would lead to more background checks on buyers.

The White House had drafted a proposal on that issue in 2013, but was concerned it could be challenged in court. Administration officials are now hopeful they can find a way to advance the plan.

Obama has also pledged to elevate the issue of gun laws during his remaining time in office, and has denounced lawmakers for bowing to pressure from the powerful National Rifle Association lobby group.

On Saturday, he said Americans could not “offer up our thoughts and prayers” for the families of the dead police officer and of the two other victims of the shooting “with a truly clean conscience” unless they also pushed for changes to make it harder to get guns.

“May God bless Officer Garrett Swasey and the Americans he tried to save – and may he grant the rest of us the courage to do the same thing,” Obama said.

(Reporting by Roberta Rampton; Editing by Frances Kerry)

This story has not been edited by Firstpost staff and is generated by auto-feed.

Aamir Khan’s remarks controversy: Satyamev Jayate cannot be morphed to fit into a political point of view

It was purely coincidental that less than 24 hours after Hindi film superstar Aamir Khan made his bombshell of a statement — that he was alarmed by the rising intolerance in the country and his wife Kiran Rao had discussed with him idea of leaving India because of concern security to their son — that Prime Minister Narendra Modi spoke of India’s tradition of ‘Vasudhaiv Kutumbkam‘ (universal brotherhood) before a huge gathering of the Indian diaspora in Singapore and a sense of confidence that the world was reposing in India.

Althought the context of Modi’s speech was different, the message to the domestic audience was not lost. It is also incidental that only two days later, Parliament is set to open for the Winter Session, thus messages emanating from prominent individuals, prime minister, political parties, ruling as well as Opposition is significant.

“If we keep on condemning ourselves, why would the world look towards us? We have to build a nation where the world’s best is in India and our best is amalgamated with the world,” Modi said.

He also responded to the criticism that he was spending lot more time touring around the globe saying that when he was chief minister, people used to ask about his acceptability in the world and his opinion on Indian foreign policy; and when he is touring the world to propound India’s cause and interests, questions were being asked about why he was touring abroad so much. He later added that the world has changed today.

File image of PM Narendra Modi and Aamir Khan. PTI

File image of PM Narendra Modi and Aamir Khan. PTI

“In this day and age, it is not possible to have relations only with four-five countries. The world is not polarised. Countries have become interdependent and even smaller countries have their importance. There is no country in the world that can claim it can do things on its own. Relations have to be continually refreshed… India needed FDI, which also stands for First Develop India,” he told the crowd that lapped up his every sentence with rapturous applause.

Around the time he has been on tour to Malaysia and Singapore, two messages have been doing the rounds on WhatsApp and other social media. The first reads “Modi missing” yet again and the other carries statistics — which are not immediately verifiable — stating: “first sixteen months of their first term foreign travel by country head: Putin 41 countries 91 days; Cameron 41 countries 71 days; Xi 27 countries 64 days; Modi 29 countries in 69 days. Only in India, a class of people find it funny.”

The central thrust of Modi’s speech in Singapore was on building confidence in India as a destination to invest, work and live.

Modi must be aware of that since Sunday night, Aamir has lent his starry weight to the intolerance debate and named his wife, and referred to his young son to add substance to his argument. He reignited the intolerance debate, which had become somewhat dormant since the results of the Bihar elections were declared. He would also have known that Congress vice-president Rahul Gandhi in a series of tweets had supported the actor and attacked his government. He must also have known that Trinamool Congress leader Derek O’Brien in an article in The Indian Express, has said that his party would prefer to have a debate on intolerance and such other issues than see Parliamentary disruptions from the word ‘go’.

Thus, under the circumstances, Modi’s words that his singular motto was “development, development and development to make India progress and become modern” carry additional meaning.

Hours before he spoke in Singapore, his party fielded its leader Syed Shahnawaz Hussain to respond to the intolerance charges made by Aamir saying: “India has given you (Aamir) name, fame and wealth. Now you are a big star, but don’t use that tag to adversely propagate against India. It looks like Aamir’s statement is to tarnish the country’s image. Your statement will give you publicity but it blemishes India’s reputation.”

“It is Incredible India (Aamir is a brand ambassador of the Incredible India campaign) and please don’t tarnish it. Don’t be under any illusion. Wherever you will go from here you will see intolerance, be it the USA, Europe, Turkey, Syria, Afganistan, etc. India’s Muslim population is greater than whole of Arab world and Europe. Muslims can’t find a better country than India and can’t find a neighbour better than one from Hindu community. It is the only country that does not see the religion of an artist and appreciates his work on merit. Who are you taking advice from? Aamir and I are of the same age, and are friends. Come, let’s debate why you want to leave India. Intolerant are those who don’t have the capacity to tolerate a popular and elected prime minister. The spectacles through which Modi sees do not distinguish between Hindus and Muslims, but sees them all as Indians,” Shahnawaz said.

He also came out strongly against Rahul Gandhi for latching on to Aamir’s statement.

Again, the thrust of BJP spokesman’s argument was that India was “incredible” and “inclusive” and worldwide confidence was being generated under Modi’s leadership, and so the term Satyamev Jayate can’t be turned upside down to suit someone’s political point of view.

McIlroy moves within a stroke of Dubai lead | Reuters

DUBAI Rory McIlroy carded a seven-under 65 in the third round of the DP World Tour Championships on Saturday and is one stroke adrift of surprise leader Andy Sullivan, who sunk a nerveless late birdie to edge ahead again.

The British pair will play together in Sunday’s concluding round after Sullivan’s 68 gave the 28-year-old an aggregate score of 200 to McIlroy’s 201 at the European Tour’s season finale.

American Patrick Reed (68) is on 203, while Argentina’s Emiliano Grillo (71) and Korea’s Byeong-hun An (66) are both a further stroke behind.

“I’m very satisfied. I hit the ball fantastically well from tee to green,” McIlroy, 26, told reporters.

“Everything was just firing today and that’s why I’m walking off the course a little bit disappointed because that 65 could have easily been a 62 or a 61. But it’s still a great position going into tomorrow.”

Sullivan had begun the day on 12-under, one stroke ahead of Grillo and four clear of the world number three McIlroy.

That meant Sullivan was last to tee off. McIlroy started two groups ahead of him and the Northern Irishman exerted some immediate pressure, making a 10-foot birdie on the first and picking up further shots at holes two and four.

Sullivan, famed for playing with a smile, looked serious on the first tee as he waited to start.

Course conditions were tough and the only respite from the sweltering heat was a sporadic, swirling, blustery wind.

Sullivan sunk a three-foot birdie on the second hole, but fluffed the chance to pick up another stroke at the third, missing from 10 feet.

LIPPED OUT

Worse was to follow on four when a simple putt lipped out for a bogey as McIlroy’s charge seemed to inhibit the usually ebullient Englishman.

Yet an eight-foot birdie at five and another on seven put Sullivan ahead again.

“I just didn’t feel like I was hitting it as close as I was yesterday,” Sullivan told reporters. “It was windy. I found it quite tough to actually get the ball the right distance.”

McIlroy was often sublime, picking up further shots at seven and 10, while the four-time major winner followed a bogey on 12 with three successive birdies.

Sullivan was unbowed, however, also birdying 15. He picked up another shot on 17 with a 20-footer that had him cupping his ears to acknowledge the roar of his boisterous fans, the self-proclaimed Sully Army.

McIlroy erred on the 18th, rolling a simple birdie chance wide, while Sullivan puffed out his cheeks in relief after later making a tricky par putt on the same green.

“If I keep putting the way I am and hitting the ball well, I can still do it,” added Sullivan.

“Rory will have his own fans out there, probably 90 percent of them, but my boys make a lot of noise. I felt like the putter really saved me the last few holes.”

As well as seeking a third tour win of the season, McIlroy is eyeing a third Race to Dubai title in four years, the prize awarded to Europe’s biggest money earner.

McIlroy led going into the season climax and of the six other golfers who could potentially usurp him, only Danny Willett still stands a chance with 18 holes to play.

The Englishman’s third-round 67 puts him on 205, four adrift of McIlroy.

“I’d love to finish the year on a high and win the Race to Dubai and more importantly win this tournament,” McIlroy said.

(Reporting by Matt Smith; editing by Toby Davis)

This story has not been edited by Firstpost staff and is generated by auto-feed.

At least two die in police raid on group planning new Paris attack | Reuters

SAINT DENIS, France A woman suicide bomber blew herself up in a police raid that sources said had foiled a jihadi plan to hit Paris’s business district, days after attacks that killed 129 across the French capital.

Police stormed an apartment in the Paris suburb of St. Denis in a hunt for Abdelhamid Abaaoud, a Belgian Islamist militant accused of masterminding the bombings and shootings, but more than 15 hours later it was still unclear if they had found him.

Heavily armed officers entered the building before dawn, triggering a massive firefight and multiple explosions. Eight people were arrested and forensic scientists were working to confirm if two or three militants died in the violence.

“A new team of terrorists has been neutralised,” Paris Prosecutor Francois Molins told reporters, saying police had fired 5,000 rounds of munitions into the apartment, which was left shredded by the assault, its windows blown out and the facade riddled with bullet impacts.

“This commando could have become operational,” Molins said.

A source close to the investigation said the dead woman might have been Abaaoud’s cousin, while the Washington Post quoted senior intelligence officials as saying Abaaoud himself had died in the shoot out.

Molins said none of the bodies had been identified, adding only that Abaaoud was not amongst those detained.

Police were led to the apartment following a tip off that the 28-year-old Belgian, previously thought to have orchestrated the Nov. 13 attacks from Syria, was actually in France.

Investigators believe the attacks — the worst atrocity in France since World War Two — were set in motion in Syria, with Islamist cells in neighbouring Belgium organising the mayhem.

Local residents spoke of their fear and panic as the shooting started in St. Denis just before 4.30 a.m. (0330 GMT).

“We could see bullets flying and laser beams out of the window. There were explosions. You could feel the whole building shake,” said Sabrine, a downstairs neighbour from the apartment that was raided.

She told Europe 1 radio that she heard the people above her talking to each other, running around and reloading their guns.

Another local, Sanoko Abdulai, said that as the operation gathered pace, a young woman detonated an explosion.

“She had a bomb, that’s for sure. The police didn’t kill her, she blew herself up…,” he told Reuters, without giving details. Five police officers and a passerby were injured in the assault. A police dog was also killed.

FLEEING RAQQA

Islamic State, which controls swathes of territory in Syria and Iraq, has claimed responsibility for the Paris attacks, saying they were in retaliation for French air raids against their positions over the past year.

France has called for a global coalition to defeat the radicals and has launched three air strikes on Raqqa — the de-facto Islamic State capital in northern Syria — since the weekend. Russia has also targeted the city in retribution for the downing of a Russian airliner last month that killed 224.

The Syrian Observatory for Human Rights monitoring group said on Wednesday the bombardments have killed at least 33 Islamic State militants over the past three days.

Citing activists, the Observatory said Islamic State members and dozens of families of senior members had started fleeing Raqqa to relocate to Mosul in neighbouring Iraq.

French prosecutors have identified five of the seven dead assailants from Friday — four Frenchmen and a man who was fingerprinted in Greece last month after arriving in the country via Turkey with a boatload of refugees fleeing the Syria war.

Police believe two men directly involved in the assault subsequently escaped, including Salah Abdeslam, 26, a Belgian-based Frenchman who is accused of having played a central role in both planning and executing the deadly mission.

French authorities said on Wednesday they had identified all the Nov. 13 victims. They came from 17 different countries, many of them young people out enjoying themselves at bars, restaurants, a concert hall and a soccer stadium.

Empowered by a state of emergency introduced in France last Friday, police here have made hundreds of sweeps across the country over the past three days, arresting 60 suspects, putting 118 under house arrest and seizing 75 weapons.

Until Wednesday morning, officials had said Abaaoud was in Syria. He grew up in Brussels, but media said he moved to Syria in 2014 to fight with Islamic State. Since then he has travelled back to Europe at least once and was involved in a series of planned attacks in Belgium foiled by the police last January.

Two police sources and a source close to the investigation told Reuters that the St. Denis cell was planning a fresh attack. “This new team was planning an attack on La Defense,” one source said, referring to a high-rise neighbourhood on the outskirts of Paris that is home to top banks and businesses.

A man in St. Denis told reporters that he had rented out the besieged apartment to two people last week.

“Someone asked me a favour, I did them a favour. Someone asked me to put two people up for three days and I did them a favour, it’s normal. I don’t know where they came from I don’t know anything,” the man told Reuters Television.

He was later arrested by police.

AIRCRAFT CARRIER

Global anxiety was reflected in a flurry of new security alerts on Wednesday after a soccer match between Germany and the Netherlands was cancelled on Tuesday evening in response to what a senior politician called a “concrete indication” of danger.

Sweden raised its threat level by one step to four on a scale of five, the high-speed Eurostar train that connects Paris and London briefly suspended check-in at Paris’s Gare du Nord and several German Bundesliga soccer teams said they were beefing up security ahead of their matches.

The Russian air force on Wednesday carried out a “mass strike” on Islamic State positions around Syria, including Raqqa, Russian news agencies reported.

Paris and Moscow are not coordinating their air strikes in Syria, but French President Francois Hollande is due to meet Russian President Vladimir Putin in Moscow on Nov. 26 to discuss how their countries’ militaries might work together.

Hollande will meet U.S. President Barack Obama, who says Russia must shift its focus from “propping up” Syrian President Bashar al-Assad, two days before that in Washington.

Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov said on Wednesday that Western nations had to drop their demands for Assad’s exit if they wanted to build a coalition against Islamic State.

Russia is allied to Assad but the West says he must go if there is to be a political solution to Syria’s prolonged civil war. Hollande said countries should set aside their sometimes diverging national interests to battle their common foe.

“The international community must rally around that spirit. I know very well that each country doesn’t have the same interests,” he told an assembly of city mayors on Wednesday.

A French aircraft carrier group was headed to the eastern Mediterranean to intensify the number of strikes in Syria. Russia has said its navy will cooperate with this mission.

(Additional reporting by Andrew Callus, Matthias Blamont, Marine Pennetier, Emmanuel Jarry, Marie-Louise Gumuchian, Jean-Baptiste Vey, Chine Labbé, Svebor Kranjc, John Irish in Paris, Alastair Macdonald and Robert-Jan Bartunek in Brussels, and Matt Spetalnick in Manila, Victoria Cavaliere and Dan Whitcomb in Los Angeles, Amran Abocar in Toronto and Dan Wallis in Denver; Writing by Alex Richardson and Crispian Balmer; Editing by Andrew Callus, Sonya Hepinstall and Philippa Fletcher)

This story has not been edited by Firstpost staff and is generated by auto-feed.

Ericsson sees video driving tenfold rise in mobile data by 2021 | Reuters

STOCKHOLM Swedish telecoms network gear maker Ericsson raised its forecast for mobile data traffic, in a further boost to companies that benefit from rising numbers of consumers viewing online videos on platforms such as YouTube and Netflix.

Ericsson, the world’s top mobile network equipment maker, expects a tenfold surge in mobile data traffic globally between 2015 and 2021 as the number of smartphone subscriptions rise. In its mobile industry report in June it forecast that growth would be eightfold between 2014 and 2020.

Inge Heydorn, fund manager at Sentat Asset Management, which invests in telecom and IT shares globally, said Ericsson is aiming to attract telecoms operators to invest in its networks by showing how much data traffic is expected to grow.

Heydorn said the inexorable rise in mobile data benefits telecoms operators more than it does Ericsson, which reported a 7 percent drop in sales this year despite the growth in smartphones.

But content providers, such as Netflix, Facebook and YouTube owner Google are the biggest winners from the increase in data traffic, he added. Ericsson last week trimmed its market growth forecast for the next few years, indicating no clear correlation between mobile traffic and telecoms operators’ investments.

“Technology development and price pressure move faster than the increase in data traffic,” said Bengt Nordstrom, head of telecoms consultancy Northstream.

YouTube accounts for up to 70 percent of all video traffic in many mobile networks, while Netflix’s share of video traffic can reach up to 20 percent in markets where it is available, Ericsson said.

Video is expected to grow by around 55 percent annually through 2021, increasing its share of total mobile traffic in 2021 to 70 percent, up from around 50 percent in 2015, Ericsson said.

In it twice-yearly Mobility Report, Ericsson said it expected there to be 6.4 billion smartphone subscriptions globally by the end of 2021, up from 3.4 billion in 2015, due to greater affordability in developing markets.

It repeated its expectation that fifth-generation mobile telephony, which will facilitate self-driving cars, will be commercially deployed in 2020.

“In 2021, South Korea, Japan, China and the U.S. are expected to have the fastest uptake of 5G subscriptions,” Ericsson said, predicting 150 million 5G mobile subscriptions by 2021.

The new generation of mobile phone technology is expected not only to bring higher data speeds, but also to better accommodate a wide variety of connected devices.

(Reporting by Olof Swahnberg; editing by Louise Heavens)

This story has not been edited by Firstpost staff and is generated by auto-feed.

Deal with ISIS flag waiving in Kashmir seriously: Shiv Sena

“ISIS, which has claimed responsibility for the Paris attacks, has lately become active in Jammu and Kashmir as well. The raising of ISIS flags in Kashmir is a very serious issue. After the human slaughter in Paris, we need to deal with this issue even more seriously,” the Sena said in an editorial in party mouthpiece ‘Saamana’.

File photo: Masked men displaying ISIS and Al Qaeda flags in Srinagar

In the wake of Paris terror attacks that claimed at least 129 lives, the Shiv Sena on Monday said that it was time India dealt with periodic incidents of waiving of ISIS flags in Kashmir with an “iron hand”. The Sena also noted that talks of human rights of terrorists should be shunned as they need to be rooted out completely.”ISIS, which has claimed responsibility for the Paris attacks, has lately become active in Jammu and Kashmir as well. The raising of ISIS flags in Kashmir is a very serious issue. After the human slaughter in Paris, we need to deal with this issue even more seriously,” the Sena said in an editorial in party mouthpiece ‘Saamana’.<!– Dna_Article_Middle_300x250_BTF –>The edit said that it was imperative for India to understand that Western countries’ fight against terror was limited to their own interests and “we need to fight terror in our own way.””Many countries including Pakistan have condemned the terror attacks in Paris. One can only laugh when a country like Pakistan condemns these attacks because the neighbouring country is a factory that makes terrorists.. But until these terror attacks happen on their soil, America and European nations won’t understand India’s pain.”Terrorists are not even leaving European nations now.Cracks are developing in their once impregnable security walls. This incident has claimed the largest number of lives after the Second World War. Europe needs to take lessons from this incident. Shun talks of human rights of terrorists and eliminate them from their roots,” the Sena said.

Belgium arrests seven as French attacks rekindle refugee row | Reuters

PARIS/BRUSSELS Two of the attackers who brought carnage to Paris were French nationals living in Belgium, officials said on Sunday, as a row over Europe’s refugee crisis re-ignited, with conservatives demanding an end to “the days of uncontrolled immigration”.

Three jihadist cells staged the co-ordinated hits on Friday night at bars, a concert hall and soccer stadium, killing 129 people and injuring 352, including 99 who were in a serious condition, Paris prosecutor Francois Molins said.

French authorities said they found the bodies of seven killers but Islamic State, which claimed responsibility as revenge for French military action in Syria and Iraq, said there were eight, raising questions over whether one was on the loose.

Prosecutors have said the slaughter involved a multinational group with links to the Middle East, Belgium and possibly Germany as well as home-grown French roots.

Belgian officials said two of the gunmen were French nationals living in Brussels and arrested seven people in the capital after two Belgian-registered cars were discovered in Paris, both suspected of being used by attackers.

Prime Minister Charles Michel said Belgium needed to do more to crack down on radicalisation

“I do not want any preachers of hatred on Belgian soil! There is no place for them in Belgium,” Michel said on Twitter.

In Germany, Interior Minister Thomas De Maiziere said there could be more would-be attackers out there and that Germany was a target country of the Islamic State group just like France.

In a sign that at least one gunman might have escaped, a source close to the investigation said a Seat car believed to have been used by the attackers had been found in the eastern Paris suburb of Montreuil with three Kalashnikov rifles inside.

Museums and theatres remained closed in Paris for a second day on Sunday, with hundreds of soldiers and police patrolling the streets and metro stations after French President Francois Hollande declared a state of emergency.

Tourists near the Eiffel Tower, one of the most visited sights in Paris, said they felt saddened and frightened.

“I think the whole of Europe should be scared, maybe the next one is in Germany, maybe the next one is in, I don’t know, Great Britain, I think the whole of Europe, the situation for the whole of Europe is very bad right now,” Austrian tourist Markus Herr said.

The first of the seven gunmen to be identified was named as Ismael Omar Mostefai, a 29-year-old who lived in the city of Chartres, southwest of Paris.

French media said he was French-born and of Algerian descent. Molins said he had a security file for Islamist radicalisation and a criminal record but had never been in jail.

Mostefai’s father and brother and others believed to be close to him had been taken in for questioning, a judicial source said.

“PARIS CHANGES EVERYTHING”

One attacker appears to have followed the route taken by hundreds of thousands of asylum seekers, crossing by boat from Turkey to the Greek Islands and seeking asylum in Serbia before heading north.

The Serbian government said the holder of a Syrian passport found near the body of one of the gunmen had passed through the country last month.

It said his details were the same as those of a man who had registered in Greece on Oct. 3, after landing on the island of Leros. They believe that another of the assailants may also have passed through Greece with Syrian refugees fleeing civil war.

The attacks have reignited a row within the European Union on how to handle the flood of asylum seekers from Syria and other countries in the Middle East, Africa and Asia.

Top Polish and Slovak officials have poured cold water on an EU plan to relocate asylum seekers across the bloc, saying the violence underlined the concerns of Europeans about taking in Muslim refugees.

But Juncker said EU states should not give in to base reactions. “The one responsible for the attacks in Paris… he is a criminal and not a refugee and not an asylum seeker,” he told a news conference on the sidelines of a G20 summit of world leaders in Turkey.

Nevertheless, Bavarian allies of German Chancellor Angela Merkel called for a reversal of her “open-door” refugee policy, saying the attacks underlined the need for tougher measures to control the influx of migrants.

“The days of uncontrolled immigration and illegal entry can’t continue just like that. Paris changes everything,” Bavarian finance minister Markus Soeder told Welt am Sonntag newspaper. Most asylum seekers entering Germany have done so through the southern state.

In Vienna, Iraqi Foreign Minister Ibrahim al-Jaafari said his country’s intelligence services had shared information they had which indicated that France, the United States and Iran were among countries being targeted for attack.

At the G20 summit, U.S. President Barack Obama vowed to step up efforts to eliminate Islamic State in Syria and prevent it from carrying out attacks like those in Paris, while European leaders urged Russia to focus its military efforts on the radical Islamists.

France was the first European state to join U.S. air strikes against Islamic State targets in Iraq in September 2014, while a year later it extended its air strikes to Syria. Russia began its own air campaign in Syria in October, but has been targeting mainly areas controlled by other groups opposed to its ally, President Bashar al-Assad, Moscow’s critics say.

YOUNG VICTIMS

Many of the victims were young people out enjoying themselves on a Friday night. The dead included one U.S. citizen, one Swede, one Briton, one German, two Belgians, two Romanians and two Mexicans, their governments said.

In the worst carnage, three gunmen killed at least 89 people at a rock concert by an American band at the Bataclan theatre before detonating explosive belts.

British police handed out leaflets to passengers arriving at St Pancras station on Eurostar trains from Paris, appealing for any information they might have.

It was the deadliest attack in France since World War Two and the worst in Europe since the Madrid train bombings of 2004, in which Islamists killed 191 people.

Israel’s spy services saw a “clear operational link” between the Paris mayhem, suicide bombings in Beirut on Thursday, which killed 43, and the Oct. 31 downing of a Russian airliner over Egypt, where 224 people died, Israeli television quoted an unnamed official as saying.

France had been on high alert since Islamist gunmen attacked the satirical weekly Charlie Hebdo and a kosher supermarket in Paris in January, killing 18 people.

Those attacks briefly united France in defence of freedom of speech, with a mass demonstration of more than a million people. But far-right populist Marine Le Pen is now making gains by blaming France’s security problems on immigration and Islam.

(Additional reporting by Michael Nienaber, Matt Spetalnick, Dasha Afanasieva, Stephen Kalin, Saif Hameed, Anthony Paone, Marine Pennetier, Barbara Lewis, Robert-Jan Bartunek and Claire Watson; writing by Crispian Balmer, David Stamp and Anna Willard; editing by Philippa Fletcher)

This story has not been edited by Firstpost staff and is generated by auto-feed.

EU should not give in to base reactions after Paris attacks – Juncker | Reuters

BELEK, Turkey European Union countries should not give in to base reactions of rejecting refugees after the Paris attacks because the shooters were criminals, not asylum seekers, European Commission head Jean-Claude Juncker said on Sunday.

Top Polish and Slovak officials have poured cold water on the EU refugee relocation plan right after the attacks late on Friday that killed 129 people, saying the violence underlined the concerns of Europeans about taking in Muslim refugees.

“We should not mix the different categories of people coming to Europe,” Juncker told a news conference on the sidelines of a G20 summit of world leaders in the Turkish coastal province of Antalya.

One of the attackers in Paris has been identified as having entered the EU through the Greek island of Leros on Oct. 3, 2015, with other refugees. On entering, he was identified and fingerprinted according to EU rules.

“The one responsible for the attacks in Paris… he is a criminal and not a refugee and not an asylum seeker,” Juncker said.

“I would invite those in Europe who try to change the migration agenda we have adopted — I would like to remind them to be serious about this and not to give in to these basic reactions that I do not like,” Juncker said.

Poland’s new Europe minister Konrad Szymanski said on Saturday his incoming government did not agree with Poland’s commitment to accept its share of an EU-wide relocation of immigrants, and now, “in the face of the tragic acts in Paris, we do not see the political possibilities to implement (this).”

On Saturday Slovak Prime Minister Robert Fico said: “We have been saying that there are enormous security risks linked to migration. Hopefully, some people will open their eyes now.”

But Juncker said there was no need to change Europe’s plan to relocate 160,000 refugees around Europe, as agreed earlier.

“I see the difficulty but I don’t see the need to change our general approach,” he said.

Donald Tusk, the former Polish prime minister who chairs meetings of European leaders, said the 28-nation EU would call on G20 leaders to develop a coordinated response to the migration crisis, which is expected to bring a million people from the Middle East and Africa to Europe this year alone.

“We do not ask our partners to do more than Europe does, but we ask the international community not to do less. All G20 countries share responsibilities associated with this crisis. Solidarity should be at the core of our decisions,” Tusk said.

(Reporting By Jan Strupczewski; Editing by David Dolan)

This story has not been edited by Firstpost staff and is generated by auto-feed.

© 2020 Yuva Sai Sagar. Theme by Anders Norén.